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Raza Rumi hosts film premiere

2016/02/09

The Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival will host its kick-off event with a one-time only screening of the internationally acclaimed hit feature narrative film SHAH (Pakistan, 2015). The screening is Sunday February 21 at 4:30 p.m. at Cinemapolis.

The first 50 people to arrive at the screening will be treated with free admission to this very special international event. SHAH trailer (in Urdu) here. The FLEFF screening will have English subtitles.

Adnan Sarwar, the film’s producer, director, screenwriter, actor, and composer, will be present at the screening.  Raza Rumi, City of Asylum Writer in Residence for the Ithaca College Honors Program, will moderate the post-screening discussion.

SHAH is a 2015 Pakistani biographical sports film based on the life of boxer Hussain Shah who won the bronze medal at 1988 Summer Olympics. He was the only boxer in Pakistan’s history to secure an Olympic medal in that sport.

The film stars Adnan Sarwar in the role of Hussain Shah. Sarwar trained for the role of the homeless boxer by undergoing a six month-long boxing training regime, where he lost 10 kilos of body weight to prepare for the role. The film cast also features Kiran Chaudhary, Sardar Baloch, Adeel Raees and Gulab Chandio.

Despite being produced as an independent film on a shoestring budget by a team of five people, SHAH has been hailed as “not only an achievement for Adnan Sarwar but for the whole Pakistani film industry. “ Sarwar was praised by critics for his portrayal of the Lyari born Pakistani boxing legend.

Adnan Sarwar (born in Lahore, Pakistan) is an actor, director, musician, screenwriter, and producer. Sarwar started his music career as a session guitar player for various Pakistani musicians such as The Trip, Mekaal Hasan Band, and Ali Zafar before forming the duo Club Caramel with singer Kiran Chaudhry in 2006.  He composed the soundtrack of his debut film SHAH.

The critically acclaimed independent Pakistani feature film SHAH is based on the true story of Olympian boxer Syed Hussain Shah. Hussain Shah started his life as a homeless child on the streets of Karachi and went on to become the 1st South Asian to win an Olympic Medal in Boxing at the 1988 Seoul Olympics. Soon after his Olympic success, Hussain Shah was forgotten by the people of Pakistan and fell back into the life of poverty where he started his life and ended as a homeless construction worker before being given one last chance for glory.  A story of triumph against all odds, SHAH was released to widespread acclaim in Pakistan on Independence Day 2015 becoming one of the biggest cinematic hits of the year.

Sarwar has commented on his acting method:  “I lived and breathed boxing. I had to go through functional resistance training and running in the morning and boxing drills in the evening with very little intake of food. It was tough.” The film production took place in Pakistan, United Kingdom and Japan.  The production team raised Rs. 2 million, saying “We’ve raised that 2 million and are going to give it to him because that’s a debt we owe him as a nation.” Sarwar has also set up a boxing scholarship for Lyari’s street kids, who are part of the film’s cast.

FLEFF’s 2016 festival kick-off event is also supported by the Honors Program at Ithaca College and the Keshishoglou Center for Global Communications Innovation in the Roy H. Park School of Communications.

ICOA’s parent organization honored

2016/02/04

Cornell University and the Center for Transformative Action (CTA) will receive a 2016 Ashoka U-Cordes Innovation Award in recognition of the innovation, adaptability and maturity of CTA’s model of social entrepreneurship.

Kakabadze convicted and fined; PEN International joins ICOA’s call to action

2016/01/26

On January 22, 2016, former Ithaca City of Asylum writer Irakli Kakabadze was found guilty by a court in the Republic of Georgia on a charge stemming from his arrest during a peaceful protest on December 25, 2015. Kakabadze, who continues to suffer ill effects from a beating he endured during his detention after his arrest, has been fined the equivalent of $40USD. He plans to appeal the conviction. Video from the trial is available online.

PEN International has joined ICOA in calling for concerned people to write to the Prime Minister of the Republic of Georgia, Giorgi Kvirikashvili, to protest this situation.

Kakabadze was arrested on December 25 during a peaceful demonstration protesting the appointment of Judge Levan Murusidze to the Appeals Court of Georgia’s High Council of Justice. Critics claim that in 2007, Murusidze, as a member of the Criminal Chamber of the Supreme Court of the Republic of Georgia, reduced the sentences of four people convicted of murdering a human rights activist.

During his detention, Kakabadze suffered a minor concussion, lost a tooth, and sustained an injury to his foot. A video of his arrest is available online.

Kakabadze, who was the Ithaca City of Asylum writer-in-residence from 2008 to 2011, is an award-winning Georgian writer who also chairs the Georgia Mahatma Gandhi Foundation. He is the author of Candidate Jokola, Maskhara and Baudrillard, Medea Rehabilitation Project, and Mother Courage of the Caucasus. He is a multifaceted artist and has collaborated with a number of other writers and performers to establish ongoing projects such as the Polyphonic Blues Band and the theater group Theater for Change. Recently, Kakabadze has been teaching at Georgian American University in Tbilisi. While a resident writer in Ithaca, New York, he taught at Cornell University and Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

To take action, please send appeals:

  • Calling for fair treatment and due process for Irakli Kakabadze;
  • Calling for immediate investigation into his physical mistreatment during his arrest;
  • Urging the authorities to ensure that there is no future harassment of writers and activists for their peaceful exercise of their right to protest or freedom of expression.

Send appeals to:

Prime Minister of Georgia Giorgi Kvirikashvili

7 Ingorokva St

Tbilisi 0114, Georgia

You can also send an online appeal to the prime minister.

 

Please send a copy of your letter to the Embassy of Georgia to the USA:

Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Archil Gegeshidze

1824 R Street, NW

Washington DC, 20009

embgeorgiausa@yahoo.com

 

Please also share a copy of your letter with PEN International: ann.harrison@pen-international.org.

 

ICOA Issues Call to Action

2016/01/12

Irakli Kakabadze

Ithaca City of Asylum board members are calling on people to write to the Prime Minister of the Republic of Georgia, Giorgi Kvirikashvili, to protest the arrest and beating of former resident writer Irakli Kakabadze by security forces in the Republic of Georgia on December 25, 2015. Kakabadze, the Ithaca City of Asylum writer-in-residence from 2008 to 2011, was detained and injured on December 25, according to e-mail reports from Zurab Rtveliashvili, a former guest writer of Stockholm city, part of the International Cities of Refuge Network project (ICORN).

Kakabadze’s mistreatment occurred during a peaceful demonstration protesting the appointment of Judge Levan Murusidze to the Appeals Court of Georgia’s High Council of Justice. Critics claim that in 2007, Murusidze, as a member of the Criminal Chamber of the Supreme Court of the Republic of Georgia, reduced the sentences of four people convicted of murdering a human rights activist.

Rtveliashvili reports that during the arrest, Kakabadze suffered a minor concussion, lost a tooth, and sustained an injury to his foot. Kakabadze, who is out on bail, will be tried beginning January 20. A video of his arrest is available on Facebook here.

Kakabadze is an award-winning Georgian writer who also chairs the Georgia Mahatma Gandhi Foundation. He is the author of Candidate Jokola, Maskhara and Baudrillard, Medea Rehabilitation Project, and Mother Courage of the Caucasus. He is a multifaceted artist and has collaborated with a number of other writers and performers to establish ongoing projects such as the Polyphonic Blues Band and the theater group Theater for Change. Recently, Kakabadze has been teaching at Georgian American University in Tbilisi. While a resident writer in Ithaca, New York, he taught at Cornell University and Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

To write to Prime Minister Kvirikashvili to insist on fair treatment and due process of Irakli and other activists, please go here and click on the box on the left hand side of the page marked “Write to Prime Minister.”

New Writer in Residence and 2015 Voices of Freedom Event

2015/11/05

Ithaca City of Asylum presents Voices of Freedom 2015, featuring our new writer-in-residence, Raza Ahmad Rumi.

2015 Voices of Freedom Announcement

 

Rumi is a Pakistani policy analyst, journalist, and author. He has been a leading voice in Pakistan’s public arena against extremism and human-rights violations. With solid policy experience through his work for the Government of Pakistan and the Asian Development Bank (as Governance Specialist), Raza entered into journalism in 2008. Since then, he has been an editor at The Friday Times, Pakistan’s foremost liberal weekly paper. He also worked in broadcast media as a leading commentator and hosted talk shows at Capital TV and Express News. Rumi was Director at Jinnah Institute, a public-policy think tank, and Executive Director of Justice Network, a coalition of NGOs. As a freelance policy professional he has been advising international development organizations, governments, and NGOs, and, until recently, he headed NAPSIPAG, an Asia Pacific network on governance. Rumi’s writings are archived at razarumi.com. His recent book Delhi by Heart was published by Harper Collins (2013). In March 2014, he survived an assassination attempt in which his driver lost his life. Within weeks, he left Pakistan and was affiliated with New America Foundation and the United States Institute of Peace.

Please join us at Voices of Freedom on November 19 to help welcome Raza Rumi into the Ithaca, New York community.

Kakabadze Assaulted in Republic of Georgia; Dolidze Takes Government Position There

2015/06/17

Ithaca City of Asylum’s fourth resident writer, Irakli Kakabadze, resumed his career as a human rights campaigner in the Republic of Georgia in 2012 after the defeat of Prime Minister Saakashvili, under whose regime he was harassed and imprisoned five times. During a February 2015 protest at a trial of the murderers of an activist, he was assaulted and threatened by a member of a paramilitary group.

Kakabadze is currently teaching at the Georgian American University and International Caucasus University. Three of his new plays have been staged in Georgia in recent years. He is also working with an advocacy group, the Institute for Multi-track Diplomacy, Georgia.

Kakabadze’s wife, Anna Dolidze, who received a J.S.D. from Cornell Law School while Kakabadze was writer in residence in Ithaca, has just been appointed Deputy Minister for Defense of the Republic of Georgia. Dolidze, who is a professor at Western Law in Canada, will have responsibilities in the area of human rights, including international relations and international law activities of the Ministry, cooperation with NATO, and the rights of veterans.

Reza Daneshvar 1948–2015

2015/06/16
Reza Daneshvar 1948-2015

Reza Daneshvar 1948–2015

The Iranian playwright, Reza Daneshvar, who was Ithaca City of Asylum’s second resident writer, passed away in Paris on May 27, 2015. He was 67 years old. Reza lived in Ithaca from 2003–2006, during which he completed English versions of Mahboobeh and Ahl (published by Vista Periodista in 2004) and Don’t Go To The Wedding With Friends of the Groom (Vista Periodista 2005), along with premiering two new plays, Sandwich Deluxe (2004) and Alfred (2005). He taught theater at Cornell University during his sojourn in Ithaca, and also collaborated with noted translator Catherine Porter, the late editor Deborah Tall, and numerous theater professionals.

“Reza made a great many friends in Ithaca,” notes ICOA board member Bridget Meeds. “He was deeply beloved for his wit, warmth, love of good food, vast curiosity, and benevolent good humor. We will miss him terribly.”

Reza was born in Machad, Iran. He studied Persian literature at both Machad and Teheran Universities before beginning a career teaching theater studies in Machad. He went on to become the head of the theater program in Khorassan province, and at the time of the revolution he was vice president of the School of Arts in Machad. He moved to Paris in 1982, and worked and wrote there for the three decades. Daneshvar was the author of seven plays; four novels, including Khosro-e Khoban (published in France as Le Brave des Braves); and three short story collections, including Mahboubeh el Al (published in France as Les Jardins de Solitude). Critics note his work reflected his immense knowledge of popular vernacular, proverbs, and folklore, as well as his masterful command of Persian.

Edward Hower’s Latest Book is an Eloquent Collection of Essays

2014/12/01

Edward Hower, a member of the ICOA board, published his latest book, What Can You Do: E.Hower's book 2014Personal Essays and Travel Writing, in October. A witch-haunted temple in India; carrying a spear in New York City operas; witnessing a revolution in Guatemala; mediums, spiritual seekers, and frauds; teaching at a maximum security prison; and how love rides the rails are but a few of the subjects in this lively and eloquent collection of essays about inner quests and journeys of discovery to out-of-the-way destinations.

Hower previously published eight novels and two books of stories, including The Pomegranate Princess and Other Tales from India (Wayne State University Press, 1991), a collection of folk tales. His writing has appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times, Smithsonian, American Scholar, Epoch, Southern Review, and elsewhere. Hower has been awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and two Fulbright grants to India.

After Hower graduated from Cornell University in 1963, he lived in East Africa for three years, where he taught high school, sang in local nightclubs, and wrote his first novel, The New Life Hotel. Later, he earned a masters degree in Anthropology from the University of California, doing fieldwork among Los Angeles street gangs.

Like many writers, Hower has held a variety of jobs: a salesman, a counselor at girls’ reformatory (the subject of his second novel, Wolf Tickets), and a general of the Egyptian army (a non-singing role he performed in the New York City Opera Company production of Handel’s Julius Caesar). More recently, he has taught at several American universities and has given writing workshops in Tobago, Greece, Sri Lanka, Britain, Nepal, and Key West, Florida. Many of these classes he has co-taught with his wife, the novelist Alison Lurie. He has lived in Ithaca, New York since 1975, and has two grown children, Dan and Lana.

An interview with the author about this book is available at The Five Points website, a journal of literature and art. Barbara Adams, another ICOA board member, wrote a review of this book that recently appeared in the Ithaca Times. What Can You Do: Personal Essays and Travel Writing, is now available at local bookstores and via the web at Cayuga Lake Books and Amazon.com.

Ithaca Out Loud: Ithaca Actors Read Ithaca Authors

2014/11/05

Celebrating the freedom to read and write in an entertaining program, “Ithaca Out Loud” showcased the talents of popular local actors reading selections from the works of five nationally recognized local authors. Ithaca City of Asylum and the Tompkins County Public Library hosted the program, ICOA’s Voices of Freedom event for 2014.

• Holly Adams read “One Hundred Dead Pilgrims” by Eleanor Henderson.

• Dave Romm read from Romancing Spain by Lamar Herrin.

• Phil Hart read “The Black Swans” by Alison Lurie.

• Dick Furnas read poetry by Caroline Manring.

• Masa Gibson read “Maintenance” by Jacob White.

“Ithaca Out Loud” took place on Thursday, November 20, to a full crowd in the BorgWarner Community Meeting Room at the library. Everyone had a great time, especially after the performances when the audience was able to mingle with the authors and actors and engage in informal discussions over refreshments.

The Writers:

  • Eleanor Henderson, a professor in the Department of Writing at Ithaca College, is the author of numerous short stories and essays and the novel Ten Thousand Saints, which was named one of the 10 Best Books of 2011 by the New York Times.
  • Lamar Herrin’s most recent novel is Fractures (2013). His short stories have appeared in the New Yorker, Harper’s, Epoch, and the Paris Review, which awarded him its Aga Kahn fiction prize. His novel The Lies Boys Tell won the Associated Writing Programs’ fiction award.
  • Alison Lurie, is the author of ten novels, including Foreign Affairs (Pulitzer Prize 1985). An authority on children’s literature, her most recent work, The Language of Houses, is a study of the social psychology of architecture.
  • Caroline Manring, who teaches in the English Department at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, is the author most recently of the collection Manual for Extinction and a poetry editor of the Seneca Review. She is the winner of the 2012 National Poetry Review Book Contest.
  • Jacob White is the author of the story collection Being Dead in South Carolina. His fiction has appeared in many journals, including the Georgia Review, New Letters, Salt Hill, and the Sewanee Review, from which he received the Andrew Lytle Prize in Fiction.

The Actors:

  • Holly Adams, a member of SAF/AFTA, has performed on stage, in film, and as a narrator of audiobooks.
  • Dick Furnas, the proprietor of a company specializing in data analysis software for ecology, has performed in several ensemble productions of the Ithaca Theater Company’s Actors Workshop and in many Ithaca College student films.
  • Masa Gibson, a former opera singer, has appeared locally with Theater Incognita and the Readers Theater of Ithaca, as well as in film, on television, and in web series.
  • Philip Hart is an aspiring actor and voice artist residing in Syracuse, NY.  Currently a student at the Actors Workshop of Ithaca, he hopes to pursue acting as a full-time endeavor.
  • David Romm, a longtime member of the Ithaca theater community, has appeared on stage at the Hangar Theater and in Ithaca College films.

Voices of Freedom 2014 was funded in part by a New York State grant administered by the Community Arts Partnership. Ithaca City of Asylum, a partnership of the Ithaca community, Ithaca College, and Cornell University, is part of a worldwide network of cities of asylum, supporting writers whose works are suppressed, whose lives are threatened, whose cultures are vanishing, and whose languages are endangered. The most recent writer, Sonali Samarasinghe from Sri Lanka, has been teaching at Ithaca College and was featured in several local newspaper articles, including the Ithaca Times.

A Voice for Freedom

2014/03/26

Sonali Samarasinghe, Ithaca City of Asylum’s fifth writer in residence, read from her new poetry chapbook, The Land My Father Gave Me, and her upcoming nonfiction book on Sri Lankan media and politics on April 9th at 5:30 pm in the Handwerker Gallery at Ithaca College. The Land My Father Gave Me, published by Ithaca press Vista Periodista, is Samarasinghe’s first book published in the U.S. and it contains an introduction by Ithaca College Professor of Writing Katharyn Howd Machan.

The reading marks the end of Samarasinghe’s two year term as the Ithaca City of Asylum writer-in-residence and Visiting Scholar in Residence for the Ithaca College Honors Program in the School of Humanities and Sciences.

“In the short time Sonali has been with us in Ithaca, she has shown us what true courage looks like,” said Bridget Meeds, board chair for Ithaca City of Asylum. “We are thrilled to join in celebrating her work.”

Sonali Samarasinghe is an award-winning journalist and human rights activist. A native of Sri Lanka, Samarasinghe practiced law there for twenty years and worked as a journalist focusing on human rights, including government corruption and women’s issues. She was forced to flee Sri Lanka in 2009 after her husband was assassinated and her family threatened.

ICOA is part of a worldwide network of cities of asylum and is a project of the Center for Transformative Action. It supports writers whose works are suppressed, whose lives are threatened, whose cultures are vanishing, and whose languages are endangered.

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